The Comical Game of Whip (c. 1931)
Delightful game made by Russell Mfg. Co. (not to be confused with Russell Playing Card Co.) c.1931, called “The Comical Game of Whip.” It consists of 8 sets of 4 identical illustrated cards, apparently to be used in a “Go Fish” type of game. Each of the 8 sets has whip, whipped, or whipping in the title: Whip-Poor-Will, Wind Whipped, Carpet Whipping, Just Whipped, Whipping Daddy, Afraid of Whip, Whip Dreams, and Never Whipped – the “Never Whipped” family showing an early portrait of Uncle Sam. The idea of “whipping” seems an odd unifying theme, and I have not seen cards like this before.
Source: Ruby Lane

The Comical Game of Whip (c. 1931)

Delightful game made by Russell Mfg. Co. (not to be confused with Russell Playing Card Co.) c.1931, called “The Comical Game of Whip.” It consists of 8 sets of 4 identical illustrated cards, apparently to be used in a “Go Fish” type of game. Each of the 8 sets has whip, whipped, or whipping in the title: Whip-Poor-Will, Wind Whipped, Carpet Whipping, Just Whipped, Whipping Daddy, Afraid of Whip, Whip Dreams, and Never Whipped – the “Never Whipped” family showing an early portrait of Uncle Sam. The idea of “whipping” seems an odd unifying theme, and I have not seen cards like this before.

Source: Ruby Lane

Deck Game (circa 1935)
Horse and jockey on metal stand. Part of a horseback deck game from the Furness Withy Line comprising of eight horses and jockeys on metal stands with round or square bases.
Source: Royal Museums Greenwhich

Deck Game (circa 1935)

Horse and jockey on metal stand. Part of a horseback deck game from the Furness Withy Line comprising of eight horses and jockeys on metal stands with round or square bases.

Source: Royal Museums Greenwhich

Women Playing a Board Game
China, Jin Dynasty (13th Century)
Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Women Playing a Board Game

China, Jin Dynasty (13th Century)

Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Milton Bradley Vectrex (box art & overlays)
One obvious liability of the Vectrex is its black and white display. Even in the early 1980s, monochrome was seen as a serious limitation in a game system, no matter how innovative its display method might be. This potential deal-breaker was addressed with heavy gauge, flexible plastic overlays produced for each game. These overlays fit snugly into plastic grooves on the top and bottom in front of the monitor, and featured high quality color printing.
The overlays not only improved the games’ aesthetics, but also provided simple instructions. The translucent, semi-transparent overlays also reduced the flicker inherent in vector displays. Since the overlays weren’t designed until after a game was considered finished, they often frustrated programmers, since further code changes had to accommodate the position of an overlay’s design elements. Nevertheless, the colorful overlays generally helped to enhance each game’s presentation and remain one of the Vectrex’s most iconic elements.
Source: TheLiberator.net & Gamasutra

Milton Bradley Vectrex (box art & overlays)

One obvious liability of the Vectrex is its black and white display. Even in the early 1980s, monochrome was seen as a serious limitation in a game system, no matter how innovative its display method might be. This potential deal-breaker was addressed with heavy gauge, flexible plastic overlays produced for each game. These overlays fit snugly into plastic grooves on the top and bottom in front of the monitor, and featured high quality color printing.

The overlays not only improved the games’ aesthetics, but also provided simple instructions. The translucent, semi-transparent overlays also reduced the flicker inherent in vector displays. Since the overlays weren’t designed until after a game was considered finished, they often frustrated programmers, since further code changes had to accommodate the position of an overlay’s design elements. Nevertheless, the colorful overlays generally helped to enhance each game’s presentation and remain one of the Vectrex’s most iconic elements.

Source: TheLiberator.net & Gamasutra

Football / Soccer / Futbol
Goalie, street football (1957).
Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Football / Soccer / Futbol

Goalie, street football (1957).

Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Gauntlet (1985)
In late 1983, Atari programmer and Asteroids(1979) creator Ed Logg began work on Gauntlet (originally titled “Dungeons”), an arcade video game Inspired by his son’s love of the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) and Dandy(1983), a D&D-style game for the Atari 800 computer. Following the infamous crash of the video game industry in 1983, the market for coin-operated video games began to shrink dramatically. At the same time, route operators who purchased increasingly expensive games and split their profits with location owners found it more and more difficult to get a return on their investments. In an environment in which consumers resisted spending more than one quarter on a game, Atari needed to, as Logg told ICHEG, figure out “how to get more money for the same amount of time.” Gauntlet’s unique design provided the answer: four simultaneous players each spending a quarter for the same amount of time.
But before players emptied their pockets to play Gauntlet, Logg and Atari designers needed to create a cabinet that could accommodate four players at once. As Logg explained, “One real problem was the players had to stand a little off the side,” which meant the game “required more floor space in an arcade or street location than a normal game. This reduced the places the game could go and it was one issue we could not solve.” Nevertheless, the final version of Gauntlet was a marvelous combination of function and aesthetics. It included a cheaper, but more reliable 19” monitor instead of its original 25” monitor with no plexiglass between the screen and the player to reduce glare.  The front of the game also had four coin mechanisms—one per player—to eliminate confusion over whose money added health to whose avatar. The massive cabinet featured enchanting fantasy side art of the warrior, valkyrie, wizard, and elf battling a host of monstrous creatures.
Source: CHEGheads Blog

Gauntlet (1985)

In late 1983, Atari programmer and Asteroids(1979) creator Ed Logg began work on Gauntlet (originally titled “Dungeons”), an arcade video game Inspired by his son’s love of the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) and Dandy(1983), a D&D-style game for the Atari 800 computer. Following the infamous crash of the video game industry in 1983, the market for coin-operated video games began to shrink dramatically. At the same time, route operators who purchased increasingly expensive games and split their profits with location owners found it more and more difficult to get a return on their investments. In an environment in which consumers resisted spending more than one quarter on a game, Atari needed to, as Logg told ICHEG, figure out “how to get more money for the same amount of time.” Gauntlet’s unique design provided the answer: four simultaneous players each spending a quarter for the same amount of time.

But before players emptied their pockets to play Gauntlet, Logg and Atari designers needed to create a cabinet that could accommodate four players at once. As Logg explained, “One real problem was the players had to stand a little off the side,” which meant the game “required more floor space in an arcade or street location than a normal game. This reduced the places the game could go and it was one issue we could not solve.” Nevertheless, the final version of Gauntlet was a marvelous combination of function and aesthetics. It included a cheaper, but more reliable 19” monitor instead of its original 25” monitor with no plexiglass between the screen and the player to reduce glare.  The front of the game also had four coin mechanisms—one per player—to eliminate confusion over whose money added health to whose avatar. The massive cabinet featured enchanting fantasy side art of the warrior, valkyrie, wizard, and elf battling a host of monstrous creatures.

Source: CHEGheads Blog

Chess
A chessgame with death by Master B.R. A German type table of the 15th century. Copper-plate engraving. Kunsthalle, Hamburg, Germany.
Source: St. Thomas Guild

Chess

A chessgame with death by Master B.R. A German type table of the 15th century. Copper-plate engraving. Kunsthalle, Hamburg, Germany.

Source: St. Thomas Guild

A Game of Troublesome Pigs (Circa 1900 - 1910)
After raiding the garden, those troublesome pigs flee the angry farmer and his trusty dog as the farmer waves his fist and swings his hickory stick. This is some of Milton Bradley’s finest chromolithography, rivaling that of McLoughlin Brothers. This wonderful early game also has a highly complex game board with a fabulously illustrated image of a group of pigs raiding a cornfield.
Source: Z & K Antiques

A Game of Troublesome Pigs (Circa 1900 - 1910)

After raiding the garden, those troublesome pigs flee the angry farmer and his trusty dog as the farmer waves his fist and swings his hickory stick. This is some of Milton Bradley’s finest chromolithography, rivaling that of McLoughlin Brothers. This wonderful early game also has a highly complex game board with a fabulously illustrated image of a group of pigs raiding a cornfield.

Source: Z & K Antiques

Commonwealth Navy
Commonwealth Navy board game, 1913, made by National Games Company, Melbourne, to celebrate the arrival of the Australian naval fleet in Sydney in October 1913. The company also released the ‘Antarctica’ board game in the same year, to celebrate Australian exploration and the expanding empire. National Museum of Australia.
Source: National Museum Australia

Commonwealth Navy

Commonwealth Navy board game, 1913, made by National Games Company, Melbourne, to celebrate the arrival of the Australian naval fleet in Sydney in October 1913. The company also released the ‘Antarctica’ board game in the same year, to celebrate Australian exploration and the expanding empire. National Museum of Australia.

Source: National Museum Australia

Mansion of Bliss - A new game for the amusement of youth
During the 18th and 19th centuries there was an explosion of board game publishing. These games were intended to be both educational and entertaining and were produced mainly for children. The major topics covered were history, geography, science, religion and moral values. The Mansion of Bliss is a typical example of the Museum’s collection of 19th century race games. It is a moral game ‘designed for the amusement of youth, with a view to promote the progressive improvement of the juvenile mind and to deter them from pursuing the dangerous paths of vice’. The game is played with a teetotum (a spinning die) and accompanied by a booklet which gives a four line verse for each playing space. These outline the rewards or forfeits associated with that space. For example ‘The Truant’ and ‘Cruelty to Animals’ result in a forfeit, while ‘Obedience to Parents’ and ‘Fidelity’ are rewarded. The first player to reach ‘The Mansion Of Bliss’ in the centre is the winner.
The publishers of board games are usually very well known as their details are printed on the games. The people who actually invented the games are not so well known. The inventor of The Mansion of Bliss was Thomas Newton who was also responsible for another moral race game called Virtue Rewarded and Vice Punished.
Source: Museum of Childhood

Mansion of Bliss - A new game for the amusement of youth

During the 18th and 19th centuries there was an explosion of board game publishing. These games were intended to be both educational and entertaining and were produced mainly for children. The major topics covered were history, geography, science, religion and moral values. The Mansion of Bliss is a typical example of the Museum’s collection of 19th century race games. It is a moral game ‘designed for the amusement of youth, with a view to promote the progressive improvement of the juvenile mind and to deter them from pursuing the dangerous paths of vice’. The game is played with a teetotum (a spinning die) and accompanied by a booklet which gives a four line verse for each playing space. These outline the rewards or forfeits associated with that space. For example ‘The Truant’ and ‘Cruelty to Animals’ result in a forfeit, while ‘Obedience to Parents’ and ‘Fidelity’ are rewarded. The first player to reach ‘The Mansion Of Bliss’ in the centre is the winner.

The publishers of board games are usually very well known as their details are printed on the games. The people who actually invented the games are not so well known. The inventor of The Mansion of Bliss was Thomas Newton who was also responsible for another moral race game called Virtue Rewarded and Vice Punished.

Source: Museum of Childhood